Medical Tests Every Woman Needs in Her, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and beyond

You exercise, eat right and get plenty of sleep -— great! But if you’re only going to the doctor’s office when you think you have a cold or need a refill on your birth control, you’re missing out on a huge area of preventative health. Having regular check-ups and routine screenings and tests can help you catch health problems and help you avoid a full-blown health crisis years down the road. So to help you take control of your health, here are the tests every woman should have done in her 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and beyond.

 

Medical Tests Women Need in Their 20s

Many twenty-somethings are guilty of blowing off doctor visits and skipping baseline screenings thanks to a combination of other preoccupations (dating, new job, starting motherhood) and, in some cases, less than adequate health insurance. But now is when you want to find a primary care physician you like, and trust, says Dana Simpler, M.D., primary care practitioner at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore.
“Your goal is to set yourself on a healthy course while it’s still relatively easy,” she says. This includes developing healthful eating habits, getting regular exercise and plenty of sleep. What you do now and how you take care of your body will help prevent health issues that can crop up as you age, such as high blood pressure and diabetes”.
 

Annual Physical

Most insurance companies cover routine visits and screenings, so why not take advantage and get familiar with some numbers like your blood pressure and cholesterol level. A thorough physical includes a total blood work-up (CBC), which tests for conditions such as anemia (low red blood cell count).
You might also get a cholesterol test, and/or a fasting glucose test (especially if you are overweight) to check for diabetes and pre-diabetes. Your doc will listen to your heart and lungs; examine your eyes, ears, lymph nodes and abdomen for anything out of the ordinary. He or she will also make note of your age, height and weight, and ask about your family medical history.

PAP Smear

According to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a PAP smear (in which a scraping of cells from the cervix is examined to detect abnormalities that could lead to cervical cancer) should be performed starting in the 20s (or soon after becoming sexually active), and then once every three years throughout adulthood. Yes, this used to be recommended annually, says Dr. Simpler, but that’s changed if your results remain consistently negative.

STD/HIV Screen

The CDC recommends that all sexually active adults be tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea, and that all patients seen in any healthcare setting receive HIV testing unless the patient opts out.

Breast Self-Exam

Past emphasis on monthly self-exams at home has faded, thanks to the changed recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which found such exams ineffective in finding potential cases of cancer. That said, women in their 20s should get to know the girls as a way to know what feels normal for your body, but not as a replacement for the clinical breast exam your doc will give you at your ob/gyn check-up.

Medical Tests Women Need in Their 30s

If you’re thinking: “It’s cool — I see my OB/GYN every year,” think again. Too many women put their overall health on the back burner while focusing solely on their lady-part health, not to mention that of their family.
“Statistically, 30-something women aren’t getting heart attacks and strokes, but now is the time to be proactive about [behaviors] that will positively impact your health,” Get your weight in check, don’t smoke, exercise and try to fit in enough sleep.

Cholesterol Test

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends a fasting lipoprotein test starting at age 20. Aim for just keeping your LDL (bad) cholesterol low — 100 mg/dl is optimal — and inching your HDL (good) cholesterol higher. Optimal is over 60mg/dl, according to the AHA. The total number to aim for is 200 mg/dl or less, and over 240 is considered high.
Triglycerides inching over 150 mg/dl should send up a red flag also, because a high triglyceride level combined with low HDL or high LDL may speed up atherosclerosis, increasing your risk for heart attack and stroke. You’ll want to repeat this test every five years, more often if you have a family history of heart disease, if you smoke or are overweight or obese.

Skin Check

The American Academy of Dermatology outlines an ABCDE approach when assessing moles on your body that require a professional’s eye:
  • A for asymmetrical
  • B for bleeding
  • C for (changing) color
  • D for diameter (greater than 6mm)
  • E for evolving
Fair-skinned women are at higher risk for skin cancer than those with darker skin. People who’ve had blistering sunburns before age 18 and those with a close family member diagnosed with melanoma are at higher risk for skin cancer. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stats, melanoma rates among women increased significantly between 1999 and 2008.
 

Thyroid Check

The gold-standard thyroid test is a blood screen for TSH, or thyroid stimulating hormone, which detects hyperthyroidism, an overactive thyroid, causing insomnia and weight loss; or hypothyroidism, an underactive thyroid, causing sluggishness and weight gain. Thyroid tests can also reveal autoimmune conditions such as Graves’ disease. Get checked if you have symptoms such as unexplained changes in mood, weight, sleep habits or cholesterol level.

Blood Pressure

You have that familiar BP cuff check every time you go to a doctor’s office, but now’s the time to start paying closer attention, especially if you have any risk factors for heart disease or stroke — a strong family history, being overweight or smoking.
Numbers to worry about: a systolic, or top, reading over 120 and a diastolic, or bottom, reading over 80, according to the American Heart Association. Hypertension — high blood pressure — is defined as 130/80 or higher.
The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends a fasting lipoprotein test starting at age 20. Aim for just keeping your LDL (bad) cholesterol low — 100 mg/dl is optimal — and inching your HDL (good) cholesterol higher. Optimal is over 60mg/dl, according to the AHA. The total number to aim for is 200 mg/dl or less, and over 240 is considered high.
Triglycerides inching over 150 mg/dl should send up a red flag also, because a high triglyceride level combined with low HDL or high LDL may speed up atherosclerosis, increasing your risk for heart attack and stroke. You’ll want to repeat this test every five years, more often if you have a family history of heart disease, if you smoke or are overweight or obese.
Medical Tests Women Need in Their 40s
At age 40 and beyond, a woman’s risk of developing conditions such as high blood pressure, heart disease, osteoporosis, diabetes and arthritis increase, and most primary care physicians encourage annual routine physicals, especially when they’re covered by most insurance plans.
 
This is the decade to take a hard look at family history. Take colon cancer for example: While colonoscopies are not recommended until age 50, if you have a parent or sibling who had the disease, or had precancerous or cancerous polyps removed, “You should get screened 10 years younger than that relative was when he or she was diagnosed,” says Dr. Simpler. So if your mom had colon cancer at 55, schedule a test for yourself when you’re 45.
 
Mammogram
The American Cancer Society had recommended that you begin annual breast-cancer screening at age 40, but the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force came out with a new stance in 2009 when it stated that routine screening need not begin until 50. They felt the risks of a decade of annual screenings outweighed the benefits.
That said, it should be noted that these new guidelines are based on clinical outcomes, not emotional concerns, and The American Cancer Society has not altered its recommendations. While mammography can be an imperfect tool, it’s still the best available. To figure out what’s right for you, discuss your personal risk and history with your doctor.

Eye Exam

If you already wear glasses, see your ophthalmologist to discuss whether you should have separate reading glasses or a bifocal prescription. Otherwise, just grab a pair of magnifying readers from the drug store.
Those who have never seen an eye doctor should make an appointment for a comprehensive exam, which, according to the American Academy of Opthalmology, can pick up early signs of age-related problems — cataracts, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration — that may be lurking without symptoms. The exam will also include an eye pressure test; pupil dilation so the doctor can look at your retina and optic nerve; and a test of visual acuity, reading letters on an eye chart.

Blood Sugar/Diabetes Test

If you haven’t already been screened for type 2 diabetes, starting now is a must, according to the American Diabetes Association. Most commonly, you’ll be given a fasting blood glucose test. A normal fasting blood glucose reading is below 100 mg/dl. If your results come in between 100 and 125 mg/dl, you’re considered pre-diabetic. If your FPG is 126 mg/dl or above, you have diabetes.
A more accurate screen for diabetes is the hemoglobin A1C test. Whereas a fasting blood test is a snapshot in time, the A1C give your doctor an estimate of your blood glucose level over a three- to four-month period. An A1C at 5.6 percent — that means the percentage of sugar in your blood — is normal; a pre-diabetic range is between 5.7 and 6.4 percent. Anything over that indicates diabetes.

Rectal Exam

Grin and bear it when your gynecologist inserts a gloved finger in your rectum during your regular pelvic exam. This on-the-spot test for fecal occult blood is important because blood in the stool is an early indicator of colon cancer, which can be diagnosed with further testing.

Medical Tests Women Need in Their 50s

After menopause, women lose some of the protection that estrogen offered during childbearing years, increasing the risk for health problems such as osteoporosis and heart disease. Go Red for Women, a heart-health initiative at the American Heart Association, notes that more women die of cardiovascular disease than from the next four causes of death combined, including cancer.
Annual physicals should be routine, and include blood pressure checks and cholesterol testing every three years. Keeping your weight under control is especially important: Declining estrogen levels also cause fat storage to shift from the hips to the waist, and increased abdominal fat raises your risk for diabetes and heart disease.

Colonoscopy

“No matter what your family history, age 50 is recommended for a first screening’. If no polyps are found, repeat testing every 10 years. “But if your doctor finds polyps classified as adenomas, which have cancerous potential, you need repeat colonoscopies every three years.”

Heart Health Check

A thorough exam early in this decade should include screening for your overall risk of heart disease. First up, a look at waist circumference. A circumference of more than 35 inches is risk factor for diabetes and heart disease. Think about asking for a blood test called the C-Reactive Protein test, which the American Heart Association recommends to assess silent heart disease risk.
An electrocardiogram (EKG), is smart for any woman over age 50, even in the absence of symptoms. If you have a family history of heart disease, “or if you have symptoms like chest discomfort, shortness of breath, palpitations, or if you’ve been diagnosed in the past with a heart murmur,”  you’ll want to schedule an echocardiogram, a noninvasive sonogram of the heart.

Bone Density Test

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has tweaked its recommendations for bone-density testing, saying that routine screening should start at age 65, while younger women should be screened only if they are at risk for fractures. Same advice comes from the National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines. That said, “most women today have been getting screened earlier,”.
Think about getting your bone density checked if you are or were a smoker, if you were prescribed steroids such as asthma medications, are very thin — there’s an added risk for being thin and Asian — have a strong family history of osteoporosis or have lost height in the last year.

Medical Tests Women Need in Their 60s and Beyond

“After age 65, your risk of getting cervical cancer goes down, so if you’ve had three negative PAP tests in the last decade, you can skip it,”. Continue to get mammograms, however, and follow up with cholesterol screenings every three years. You might want to talk to your doctor about a cognitive or memory screen.
And keep exercising. Exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of dementia, lower blood pressure and blood sugar — and it will give you more energy to enjoy the grandkids. Studies have shown that older women who began or maintained weight-training programs improved their overall health in so many ways, including increasing bone mineral density, increasing strength and the ability to perform daily activities, which decreases the risk of falls and injuries.
 

Bone Density Test

According to the latest recommendations by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) all women over 65 should receive routine bone-density screenings. The National Osteoporosis Foundation’s guidelines concur.
If you haven’t gotten a bone-density test before, do so. If you are or were a smoker, or you used steroids for extended periods in the past (for example, to treat asthma), if you are very thin, have a family history of osteoporosis or have lost height in the last year, your risk for the disease increases.

Vitamin D Test

The older you get, the harder it is for your body to make vitamin D, even if you are spending some unprotected time in the sun. As a result, you may end up more vulnerable to osteoporosis. Ask your doctor to test your vitamin D level, particularly if you live in the Northeast, or are African-American.
Some recent studies have linked higher levels of Vitamin D3 (2000 IUs daily) with lower rates of colorectal cancer, and reduced risks of other cancers including breast and pancreatic, as well as protection against osteoporosis.

Depression Screening

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, depression affects more than 6.5 million Americans who are 65 and older. Talk to your doctor if you’re feeling blue, uninterested in activities you used to enjoy or if you have significant sleep or appetite changes.
“Your doctor can administer what’s called a Geriatric Depression Scale, which will help him or her understand if you need further treatment,”. Once diagnosed the prognosis is good: According to NAMI, 80 percent of clinically depressed individuals can be effectively treated by medication, psychotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) or any combination of the three.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Advertisements

Avocado Toast With Beet Hummus

 

Heart-shaped avocado slices and a gorgeous red hummus make this the perfect snack to show yourself some love. What’s more, the chickpeas used to make this colorful toast are a great source of vegetable-based protein.

INGREDIENTS

SERVES 6

  •  2 serving Raw Red Beet (small)
  •  1 Chickpeas (garbanzo beans, bengal gram), mature seeds, canned, drained solids
  •  2 tbsp Tahini Sauce
  •  1 oz lemon juice
  •  1 tsp Sea Salt
  •  6 slice Ezekiel
  •  3 serving Large Whole Avocado

DIRECTIONS

1Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.











2Cut the stem off the beet and peel the outer skin with peeler. Wash and dry it with paper towel.
3Place it in foil pouch and fold foil closed.












4Bake the beet for 35-40 minutes or until softened.








5Place the chickpeas in a food processor and process until a stiff paste forms, stopping every few seconds to scrape down the sides of the processor. With the food processor still running, add cooked beets, tahini, juice from half a lemon, and salt. Once that has been incorporated, add ice water if texture is too stiff and process until smooth.
6Cut three avocados in half and remove skin and pit. Next, thinly slice each avocado half lengthwise and gently fan out the slices. Shape the avocado fans into hearts.
7Spread each piece of toast with beet hummus and half of a sliced avocado.

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

DIY GINGERBREAD HOUSE TUTORIAL

DIY GINGERBREAD HOUSE

In this video I designed a gingerbread house for a very special family. I was so happy to see the the smile on their faces. It was a lot of work and patience. I hope you enjoy this video. Please give it a big thumbs up and please don’t forget to subscribe to my channel.

WATCH MY VLOGS HERE!

http://www.youtube.com/user/jenniferlynn

FOLLOW ME HERE!!

twitter: https://twitter.com/beautyglamglam

instagram: @jenniferlynnvlog

https://www.instagram.com/jenniferlyn…

snapchat: @prettypinkjen

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jenniferlynn…

uber code: jenniferb4664ue

business inquiries only:

prettypinkbeautyglam@gmail.com or jennifersauri@aol.com

The content published on the blog/youtube channel is protected by copyright, and any unauthorized copying, reproduction, republishing, uploading, posting, transmitting or duplicating of any of the material is prohibited without my expressed written permission. To obtain permission to copy portions of the blog/YouTube channel, please send an e-mail to me at prettypinkbeautyglam@gmail.com or inbox me via my YouTube channel.

_________

Jenniferlynn!

Executive Producer, JenniferLynn

Editor, JenniferLynn

Music by, https://youtu.be/FuAgLHJnc-Y

_________

GEEK INFO

Camera: Sony DSC-HX80 https://www.bestbuy.com

Audio: Blue Yeti USB Microphone: https://www.bhphotovideo.com

Lighting: Diva Ring Light: https://socialite-lighting.com

Editing: Picmonkey + IMovie

Thank you all so much for your love and support. I hope you enjoy reading ♥

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

HOLIDAY MAKEUP

HOLIDAY MAKEUP/ TONING HAIR

I used 20 Volume Developer, Wella T18 Toner products can be purchased from https://sally’s.com

To maintain my hair color and shape I use
Nelson Beverly Hills Moisture Healing Mask
https://www.nelsonhaircare.com
Hot Toddy: Heat/UV Protectant
https://www.drybar.com
Aveda: damage Remedy
https://www.aveda.com

WATCH MY VLOGS HERE!
http://www.youtube.com/user/jenniferlynn

FOLLOW ME HERE!!
twitter: https://twitter.com/beautyglamglam
instagram: @jenniferlynnvlog
https://www.instagram.com/jenniferlyn…
snapchat: @prettypinkjen
facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/jenniferlynn…

uber code: jenniferb4664ue

business inquiries only:
prettypinkbeautyglam@gmail.com or jennifersauri@aol.com

The content published on the blog/youtube channel is protected by copyright, and any unauthorized copying, reproduction, republishing, uploading, posting, transmitting or duplicating of any of the material is prohibited without my expressed written permission. To obtain permission to copy portions of the blog/YouTube channel, please send an e-mail to me at prettypinkbeautyglam@gmail.com or inbox me via my YouTube channel.

_________

Jenniferlynn!

Executive Producer, JenniferLynn
Editor, JenniferLynn
Music by, No Copyright sounds Mix 2017

_________

GEEK INFO

Camera: Sony DSC-HX80 https://www.bestbuy.com
Audio: Blue Yeti USB Microphone:
https://www.bhphotovideo.com
Lighting: Diva Ring Light:
https://socialite-lighting.com
Editing: Picmonkey + IMovie

Thank you all so much for your love and support. I hope you enjoy reading ♥

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Platinum Blonde

How to touch up platinum blonde with shadow

I wanted to show how I touch up my hair using Sally products on a budget. all under $20.00. also, how to leave some of your new growth as a shadow.

PRODUCTS MENTIONED

Wella T14, T18

Salon Care developer

Prism lights

Coconut oil

WATCH MY VLOGS HERE!

http://www.youtube.com/user/jenniferlynn

FOLLOW ME HERE!!

twitter: https://twitter.com/beautyglamglam

instagram: @jenniferlynnvlog

https://www.instagram.com/jenniferlyn…

snapchat: @prettypinkjen

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jenniferlynn…

uber code: jenniferb4664ue

business inquiries only:

prettypinkbeautyglam@gmail.com or

jennifersauri@aol.com

The content published on the blog/youtube channel is protected by copyright, and any unauthorized copying, reproduction, republishing, uploading, posting, transmitting or duplicating of any of the material is prohibited without my expressed written permission. To obtain permission to copy portions of the blog/YouTube channel, please send an e-mail to me at prettypinkbeautyglam@gmail.com or inbox me via my YouTube channel.
Thank you all so much for your love and support. I hope you enjoy reading ♥

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

9 Things to Do for Amazing Hair








Ever watch a hair commercial and wonder just how they get the models’ hair so healthy and shiny? Well, aside from hiring a full-time staff of hairdressers and a top-notch lighting crew, there are more practical ways to get healthier hair. Your hair is a focal point because it’s difficult to hide. If you’ve decided it’s time your tresses got a little more TLC, here’s how to go about it.


1 Ease Up on the Dry Shampoo

Dry shampoo is a quick fix that’s designed to absorb excess oil at the root. While it may save you time and water, it’ll also result in your hair smelling unpleasant. And besides the odor, your scalp will respond by becoming flaky and itchy. “Your skin doesn’t stop at the hairline.” Your scalp is an extension of the rest of our skin and shares in its vital processes. “Without routine shampooing and conditioning, dead skin cells can build up, moisture can’t get in or out and we get an itchy, flaky scalp as a result. Think of dry shampoo as your backup plan, not your go-to.

2 Wash Your Hair Regularly

The no-shampoo movement claimed that not lathering up would allow your hair’s natural oils to be distributed more liberally, leaving you with a shinier, healthier mane. Some experts disagree. Your scalp, like the rest of your skin, helps get rid of what’s not needed. “Does [shampooing] stimulate hair growth? It’s hard to say. But not cleaning your scalp certainly isn’t helping. The buildup, oil, congestion and pollutants all have to be taken into account when it comes to maintaining healthy hair.” So what constitutes washing hair regularly? “The ideal is two to three times a week.” However, if you have an oilier scalp, you may need to wash your hair more frequently.
 
3 Pick the Right Shampoo
The shampoo aisle at your local beauty supply store can be overwhelming.  Washing your hair with a caffeine-based shampoo keeps the scalp in optimum condition for hair growth. “And it’s always a good idea to shampoo twice monthly with an antifungal shampoo.” Already have a shampoo you love? “An old remedy of adding bergamot essence and bay rum to shampoo is a nice, inexpensive way to stimulate growth.”
4 Eat Plenty of Protein
When it comes to your hair, beauty really does come from within. What you put into your body has a direct impact on the vitality of your tresses. Protein is an important building block of hair, and when you consume too little your body shifts into a shedding phase. “Vegans and vegetarians should ensure that they add enough plant-based protein and iron into their diets. Non-vegetarians should be sure to consume two to three servings of protein a day.” Great sources of protein can be found in meat, chicken, fish, eggs, some cheeses, dried beans, tofu, grains and nuts. And ensuring you get optimal vitamin and mineral intake is also essential for healthy hair.

5 Stimulate Your Scalp

Besides the fact that giving your head a decent massage feels good, it also helps stimulate your scalp and healthy hair growth. “The shampooing action is as beneficial as a massage is to any other area of your body.” “Massaging stimulates blood flow to the scalp, which in turn feeds the hair follicles with nutrients necessary for hair growth.” But when you’re shampooing, use your fingertips — not your fingernails — to gently massage your scalp.

6 Be Gentle With Your Hair

If healthier hair is your goal, give your tresses some TLC. It’s all in the little things. When untying a ponytail, for example, remove the elastic with care. “I can’t tell you how many careless ponytails I see and clients who rip the hair elastics out without a thought.” Also, don’t let your hair grow too long; regularly visit your hairstylist for a trim. “Hair that’s too long can look and feel unhealthy.” “And be careful not to overprocess hair around the hairline. Hair is more fragile and delicate there.” Minimize your hair’s exposure to high heat by limiting blow-drying, curling and straightening.

7 Brush Your Hair Frequently

There’s some truth to the saying that 100 brushstrokes a day makes your hair healthy, shiny and strong. “Oil from the scalp conditions the root area, but it has no way to travel to the ends.” “So what happens when we shampoo? The unprotected ends get more and more dry, damaged and brittle.” The solution to this, is routine brushing in order to bring those natural oils down through to the ends. “Do this before you shampoo your hair so that the hair is evenly coated at the ends just as it is the scalp area.” I add that routine brushing also helps exfoliate dead skin on the scalp as well as stimulates circulation, which is great for your scalp.

8 Protect Your Hair at Night

It’s not just what you do during your waking hours that can work wonders for your hair health. I suggest sleeping on a silk pillowcase. “Because it’s a smoother material, it prevents a lot of tugging on the hair. I also advise braiding your hair before bedtime (if you have long hair) to prevent excess tangling, which could lead to breakage.

9 Avoid These Worst Offenders

OK, you know what to do, but what about what not to do? The following are obstacles to growing a healthy head of hair. “If you’re a man, never take anabolic steroids. It will accelerate hair loss dramatically. Don’t smoke or do recreational drugs, as both can cause damage to your hair. Both tight braiding and harsh chemical treatments can lead to breakage. I will also, adds that stress and hair loss go hand in hand. “Try to manage stress as effectively as possible with meditation, yoga or exercise.”

What Do YOU Think?

Do you struggle with hair that’s dull and lifeless and just won’t grow? What have you tried? Have you employed any of the tips and techniques mentioned above? What has worked for you? Share your advice in the comments section below.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: